22 Feb

Studio Louts

Written by TehGunky Published in Read 1 time

Synthetic Lout hit the studio yesterday, and we hammered out the bed tracks for six new arrangements. Add that to the seven songs we did last session and we have the makings of a fine CD.

Studio Louts

I used the same studio rig this time as last time - Epiphone SG Special directly into the Marshall JCM900 Model 4101 combo, running at 100w. 

To get my sound, I play through the bridge pickup, with the volume either rolled back to 8 or full open, and the tone always full open. I use the JCM900's B channel for the harsher distortion, and crank the gain. Bass is rolled back to 6.5, Mids are at 10, Treble is at 8, and Presence is at 5. I set the Reverb at 2, and had the volume at about 5. I get good studio volume at this level, and can get a bit of feedback if I stand right in front of the amp. 

Hallucinogenic Heath Cat used his same setup as last time, as well: 60s-re-issue Stratocaster through a chain of pedals into a Fender amp. I'm not certain on his settings and don't want to give away his secrets, but he produces a heavily-scooped sound, which kind of wraps around my mids-heavy humbuckers-through-tubes sound.

Studio Louts

Personally, I don't like using a bunch of pedals. I like my rig to be simple and raw-sounding, and I get that with a humbucker-equipped guitar straight through the Marshall. It may not be the sound for everybody, but it's the sound I very much like. I do, however, own a few different pedals, and use them sparingly for particular things. 

I brought the Way Huge Sound Swollen Pickle Mk II fuzz pedal into the studio yesterday and used it for one song, "Snitches Get Stitches." I played it through the A channel with the gain set to 10, using the neck pickup with the tone turned all the way down. This gives a fat, giant doom-sludge tone that sounds fucking amazing with low tunings - it doesn't really work for palm-muted "chugging" because it's way muddy, but if you can hammer a chord and let it ring out, it makes for a big demonic growl. In that song, we're playing power chords on the 6th and 5th strings. For the beds, I use my usual 2-note power chord (root + 5th). With the Swollen Pickle, I added a layer on top, and I played 3- and 4-note power chords (root + 5th + octave on  6th string chords, and the same for 5th string chords but with the addition of an inverted 5th (the 5th one octave lower than the root - your forefinger "barres" the 6th and 5th strings, ring and pinky fingers fret the 5th and octave). This adds weight to the higher-pitched chords and makes them sound much more menacing - especially with the huge grinding fuzz. We're going for a "wall of guitars" sound in that song, so we're probably going to layer in another track or two on top of the 3 we already have. 


Next weekend, we're doing overdubs and vocals. I get to drop a few solos, and I'll be redoing my part in "Madman Behind The Wheel" - we ended up doing several takes, and that song makes my left hand cramp up pretty bad, which I can hear quite clearly at the end of the take we decided was the "keeper." What I may end up doing is splitting my part into 3 separate parts.


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